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sponsored by wpbt >> susie: good evening, everyone. the u.s. financial markets were closed to mark independence day. so tonight we'll take a break from our usual reporting to take a look at the state of the economy and the markets at the year's half-way point. >> tom: susie, it's often said that the financial markets hate uncertainty and over the past six months, there was plenty of uncertainty about where the economy was headed. there was even some talk about the possibility of a double-dip recession. >> susie: and as midwest bureau chief diane eastabrook reports, the lack of clear economic signals made it hard for many businesses to plan ahead: >> reporter: kidsnips gives a lot of haircuts. it's a business that operates nine hair styling salons in the chicago area, catering mostly to children. but last year, kidsnips took a haircut itself-- a financial one that is. when the u.s. economy blew up, kidnsips' business did, too. owners kim stolz and jill gordon say cash-strapped customers got fewer haircuts. they bought even fewer of the toys and games kidsnips also sells. this year b
and expertise in a range of industries. what can we do for you? >> and now "bbc world news." >> at the u.s. steps up efforts to find those behind a leak of military secrets. presidents karzai say it puts afghan formants in danger. >> we consider that concern -- we consider that extremely irresponsible. >> the british prime minister and his trip to india defending his comments about pakistan's record on tackling terrorism. we report from the heart of the terrorist threat -- a town plagued by suicide bombings. >> people tell us is important that we should not say -- should not stay in any one place for about 20 minutes for our own safety. it has become one of the most dangerous places in pakistan. >> welcome to "bbc world news" broadcast on pbs in america and also around the globe. coming up later for you -- a french woman admits killing eight of her newborn babies, trying to hide the births from her husband. and the new starlet of indian cinema with a famous father talks about turning jane austen and to a bollywood blockbuster. >> in the first afghan government reaction to the wikileaks inv
with former u.s. senator sam nunn and the increasing tension caused by iran's nuclear ambitions. he serves as the co-chair of the nuclear threat initiative. recently the u.n. and u.s. announced a new round of sanctions against iran for failing to comply with previous restrictions. also, levar burton is here. he is back with a new film called "the jensen project," premiering friday night on nbc. sam nunn and actor lavar burton, coming up right now. -- sam nunn and actor levar burton, coming up right now. >> all i know is his name is james, and he needs extra help with his reading. >> i'm james. >> yes. >> to everyone making a difference, you help us all live better. >> nationwide insurance supports tavis smiley. with every question and answer, nationwide insurance is happy to help tavis improve of financial literacy and remove obstacles to economic empowerment one conversation at a time. nationwide is on your side. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. [captioning made possible by kcet public television] tavis: sam nunn is a former u.s. senator from g
. a complex u.s.-russia spy swap was underway late today, involving ten russian agents here and four people convicted of espionage in russia. >> woodruff: and i'm judy woodruff. on the "newshour" tonight, we get the latest on the action in a new york court today and look at russia's deep-cover spy program. >> lehrer: then, we talk to white house chief of staff, rahm emanuel. >> woodruff: tom bearden reports from the gulf of mexico, where scientists are turning to tiny microbes to help clean up oiled marshland. >> lehrer: margaret warner examines the pentagon's new rules for dealing with the news media. >> woodruff: and jeffrey brown has a conversation with jean- michel cousteau about his famous father-- ocean explorer jacques cousteau. >> when people ask what do you expect to find? he would always say if i knew, i wouldn't go. so it was the sense of discovery which is, obviously, related it to adventure. >> lehrer: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> this is the engine that connects abundant grain from the american heartland
, susie, on the labor market and housing. >> susie: u.s. secretary timothy geithner told the pbs newshour, it is important to remember the financial crisis cut very deep with millions of americans losing their jobs. >> tom: while geithner acknowledges we have an enormous whole to climb out, he says the economy is healing. he spoke about strong exports and increased business development. and the treasury secretary spoke with the "news hour"'s jim lehrer. >> if it is going so well, why does it feel like it isn't going so well. >> the scars of this recession were traumatic. people saw the value of their savings plummet. a terrible blow to basic confidence. you're still seeing lasting effect of that damage on business confidence and how people feel about their basic lives. people, understandably, feel a little cautious and tentative. we've seen a little concern about europe wash across the economy. no recoveries are even and steady. what you can say today with confidence is we're in a much stronger position today than we were 18 months ago. much stronger position to deal were you with were ou
of spying in the west in exchange for suspects arrested in the u.s.. some of the world's most influential scientists are cleared of hiding key data to exaggerate global warming. welcome to "bbc world news," broadcast on pbs in america and around the globe. coming up later, they are blind and deaf, and this is really theater group is a big hit on broadway and in london. and spain celebrants' making it to the world cup final, beating germany 1-0. -- and spain celebrates making it to the world cup final, beating germany, 1-0. >>> hello. britain has confirmed its troops are being moved out of an afghan province of homeland, where the have taken heavy casualties. 1/3 of all british losses have been in helmand province. american forces will take over in far greater numbers, described officially as the redeployment. the taliban as likely to portray it as a victory for them. frank gardner has this report. >> more than 90 britons have died fighting here. it is by far the most dangerous place to serve, or roadside bombs and cyprus and the cliffs eclipsed much of the progress. soon, it will be ameri
because the turks have been very upset with the u.s. policy toward iran. they see it as too confrontational. the problem is that the americans are not in an advice- taking mode. actually we're not very good at taking advice in general. we're actually used to giving advice. the idea that we should have partners in the middle east who have other ideas about how to approach the crises there. we should maybe adjust our policies according to what our friends in the neighborhood suggest. it's something we're just not ready for. and so senator kerry on the broadcast here recently said to me, you know, turkey speaks to and has resonance with the arab street today, number one. number two, they're in a contest for leadership in the arab world. >> you're absolutely right. i wouldn't say just the arab world but the whole middle east. turkey is now able to play a role that no other country can play. how did turkey get to this position? because it's only been ten years that turkey has been really active in the world. before that turkey was just the loyal faithful foot soldier of the u.s.
's u.s. ambassador about the airliner crash that killed 152 people, and she examines u.s./pakistani relations after the leak of thousands of secret military documents. >> ifill: we ask environmental engineer nancy kinner to track what's happened to the oil in the water. 100 days after the gulf disaster. >> lehrer: and spencer michels tells the story of a one-man mission to help clean up the oil in louisiana. >> a private individual has taken it upon himself to try to protect the barrier islands in the gulf of mexico. >> lehrer: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> this is the engine that zero emission technologies to breathing a little easier, while taking 4.6 million truckloads off the road every year. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and the william and flora hewlett foundation, working to solve social and environmental problems at home and around the world. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting
the stage for the largest russia-u.s. spy swap since the cold war. in new york, 10 people plead guilty to spying. allegations of a bomb plot in norway. three men arrested on suspicion of links to al qaeda. thousands rally at the solidarity march for captured israeli soldier to return to jerusalem. a warm welcome to bbc world news, broadcast on pbs in america and around the globe. coming up later for you, could this be the future of air travel? the plane powered by the energy of the sun. and fifa promises action over the refereeing mistakes at this world cup. the bbc is told they'll be changed in time for 2014. >> in a new york court, 10 people accused of spying for russia have pleaded guilty and ordered deported. it seems to be part of a prisoner swap between the american and russian government, the largest since the cold war. a u.s. prosecutor says russia agreed to release a number of prisoners, it's believed up to four. >> this evening, in a new york court, the final pieces of a spy swap looked to be falling in place. the 10 people arrested last week as russian undercover spies appea
. president obama led a chorus of concern over the huge disclosure of classified u.s. military documents about the war in afghanistan. >> ifill: and i'm gwen ifill. on the newshour tonight, two takes on the document dump. first, senators jack reed and kit bond assess what it could mean for the war effort. >> lehrer: then, judy woodruff talks to david leigh of the "guardian" and media watcher alex jones on the journalism impact. >> ifill: holly pattenden of "business monitor international" in london looks at the corporate shake-up at b.p. >> lehrer: tom bearden reports from the alabama gulf coast on kenneth feinberg and the complicated mission of compensation. >> and the lead is still tied up they still compensation hasn't been forth coming. >> when i was a young person working in these places, didn't see a way out. and i certainly didn't think the way out would be this. >> lehrer: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corpor
in switzerland at the request of the united states. he was told today he is a free man. he is wanted in the u.s. in connection with his conviction for having sex with a 13-year- old girl 30 years ago. swiss authorities said the u.s. did not make a convincing argument for his extradition. >> two months in a swiss jail. eight months under house arrest at his luxury shall i in the alps, in less legal wrangling, but now, switzerland has finally decide what to do about roman polanski. >> this morning, i have informed the lawyer of mr. polanski. i have also informed the ambassadors of the united states, france, and poland. it is also the case that the freedom-restricting measures against mr. polanski have been lifted. that is the electronic monitoring has been detached. >> it is nonsensical that an extradition demand should be formulated like this. it was based on information and facts that are erroneous, full of lies, and, as mr. polanski wrote in the only occasion when he broke his silence, he feels that he has already been punished. >> the decision not to extradite roman polanski is based on conti
this summer. >> lehrer: margaret warner talks to global post reporter jean mckinsey about u.s. efforts to build up local security forces in afghanistan. >> ifill: and geoffrey brown talks to artist chuck close and his biographer christopher finch about art and overcoming adversity. >> i have a great deal of difficulty recognizing faces. especially if i happen to... if i've just met somebody, it's hopeless. >> brown: you are known for portrays of faces. >> i was driven to make them. i'm absolutely positive. >> lehrer: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> lehrer: the stock market rallied for the first time in more than a week. the dow jones industrial average was up more than 170 points before dou
more u.s. soldiers were killed in afghanistan in the last 24 hours, bringing the total to 66 for july-- the most in a single month since the war began. >> woodruff: and i'm judy woodruff. on the "newshour" tonight, ray suarez talks to two veterans of the iraq and afghanistan conflicts about the continued challenge from deadly roadside bombs or i.e.d.s-- the number one killer of americans. >> lehrer: we explore the latest mix of economic numbers and the prospects for the auto industry with business reporter micki maynard and economist martin bailey. >> woodruff: david brooks and ruth marcus, sitting in for mark shields, present their analysis of the week's news. ♪ >> lehrer: and sting with strings. jeffrey brown talks to rock star sting about his newest musical challenge-- performing with a 45 piece orchestra. >> the royal if i ma mar:-- philharmonic is a serious orchestra. so in a way it does flatter my ego but also i have to step up to the plate and... and you know, so it's a big challenge for me. >> lehrer: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newsho
to 454,000. that's the lowest level since early may. late today, the u.s. treasury declined to label china a currency manipulator, citing that country's recent move to end the yuan's peg to the dollar. in a report to congress, treasury secretary geithner said what matters most is how far and how fast china's currency appreciates. meantime, interest rates are staying the same in the euro zone. the european central bank met today decided to join the bank of england in leaving its benchmark interest rate at an historic low. meanwhile, u.s. mortgage rates continue to drop-- the average rate on a 30-year fixed mortgage is at a record low 4.57%. and u.s. government scientists have made what could be a major breakthrough in the battle against h.i.v. they've discovered two human antibodies that can stop more than 90% of known global h.i.v. strains from infecting human cells in the laboratory. the breakthrough could be used to create improved vaccines and treat h.i.v. infections. >> susie: still ahead, the bond market's been on a tear recently. coming up, analysts weigh in on whether the run
, a man who knows afghanistan and pakistan well and who the u.s. military is increasingly listening to. >> i think one of general mcchrystal's legacies is that the elders really felt that we were there to listen and help them. although he was called the architect of the kandahar operation, which means hope in pashto, which was supposed to materialize, he, by the means of the elders, was advised not to do this operation. >> charlie: pakistan's ambassador to the united states, and greg mortenson. next. funding for charlie rose was provided by the following. ♪ >> additional funding provided by these funders. >> and by bloomberg. a provider of multimedia captioning sponsored by rose cmunications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> charlie: in the first public reaction, today, to the leaking of the documents about afghanistan and pakistan, president obama said that he was concerned about the leaks but there was no new information coming from them. >> while i'm concerned about the disclosure of sensitive information from the battlefield that could potentially jeopar
legality and international norms. >> the u.s. wants these vital allies in the region to patch up their differences. american pressure is certainly being felt, but for turkey is hard line stance and it is winning fans and the middle east. >> israel definitely violated international law and violated the lives of those peaceful protestors who showed solidarity with the people of gaza. to break the siege that is called declared to be illegal -- >> turkey has a lot to lose from a complete break with israel. its armed forces would have to find new sources for much of the sophisticated equipment it uses against kurdish militants. but a biggest -- the biggest cost is playing the role of the regional power. a role that depends on it being able to talk to everyone. >> israel today has set out new rules governing the gaza blockade. the prime minister is about to start a visit to washington and president obama has long been urging israel to lift the blockade entirely. israel is not doing that, but its new list will specify the items not allowed in. restrictions have been lifted on food and c
legislation makes it extremely difficult for foreigners to seek -- sued the u.s. government over acts of war. >> the bbc has invited the pentagon to comment, we have had no response. no hesitation on the subject of north korea. we are targeting the leadership and their assets. that was the message from hillary clinton today as she announced further sanctions against north korea. tensions in the area have been rising, our correspondent has the report. >> hillary clinton was given her first of close glimpse of north korea. the u.s. secretary of state's visit to the heavily fought -- heavily fortified border was a part of the symbolism of this trip, a show of support for their south korean and allies. at a press conference, mrs. clinton made clear that there was substance. >> today i am announcing a series of measures to increase our ability to prevent north korea's proliferation and halt their illicit activities that funds their weapons programs as the surge brings more provocative action. these are aimed at the procurement of material. >> punishment for no. 3 apostle legend torpedo into the w
's been a deadly 24 hours for u.s. forces in afghanistan. eight americans were killed in separate attacks. >> ifill: and i'm gwen ifill. on the "newshour" tonight, this month's u.s. death toll stands at 33 so far on track to top last month's record of 60. we have the latest on the violence, the dangers and the difficulties on the frontlines. >> lehrer: then, we assess the risks and benefits of the diabetes drug, avandia. >> ifill: we have another report from haiti-- six months after the earthquake. tonight, ray suarez looks at the road ahead for the many amputees. >> thousands of haitians lost limbs in january's earthquake. international charities are bringing pros thesees, mobility and hope. >> lehrer: and margaret warner updates the charges against six new orleans police officers in the killing and cover-up of unarmed citizens after hurricane katrina. >> what appears to me is that the officers based upon the admitted statements immediately decided to not tell the truth. that's just disgusting. >> lehrer: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has be
the recession butc u.s. economy'sñr recovery.ñté:uk report, the sector faces some uncertainty for the rest of the year. >> reporter: the basic materials sector could be the comeback kid when firms report second-quartfbñr earnings. companies in that sector make everything from steel4p!o . thomson reuters estimates profits for the 32 basic materials companies in the s&p 500 index will top $6 billionÑi in the secondÑi quarter. that's nearly double what they made a year ago during the depth of the reception when-- recessionçó when some basic materials companies lost money. analysts say the segment is benefitting from the u.s.e@6hce they also admit the recoveryñr has been anemic. that isçóÑi reflected in the dow jones u.s. basic materials sector index.1f itÑi took off in the beginning of the year as factory orders increaseÑi on signs theçó economy was improving.Ñi butÑi theñr index tanked in theú crisis in europe could spread here.Ñi kimberlieñr dubord follows it for briefing.com. she says the sector has been improving in recent week bus there is still concern about our eco
,249. a batch of new numbers raised more questions today about where the u.s. economy is headed. the latest data on jobs, housing and manufacturing underscored concerns that the recovery may be losing steam at the year's midpoint. in manufacturing, the federal reserve reported factory output fell last month after three months of growth. at the same time, new claims for jobless benefits fell to the lowest in nearly two years. but it was mostly due to seasonal factors. meanwhile, the private firm realtytrac reported 528,000 home foreclosures in the first six months of 2010. the company warned that lenders could repossess more than one million homes by year's end, a new record. at that rate, it could take until 2013 to work through the backlog of repossessed properties. president obama focused on the broad economic picture, as he spoke at the ground breaking of a new factory in holland, michigan. >> the progress we've made so far is not nearly enough to do - - undo the enormous damage that this recession caused. as i've said since the first day i took office, it's going to take time to reverse the
.p. began polluting the gulf of mexico and u.s. coastline, the company has a new leader and new strategy. the company's new chief executive, bob dudley, said change is coming, even though he's a longtime b.p. insider. >> we're going to learn a lot, and the industry's going to learn a lot, and there's no question that we will change as a company and from those learnings. >> reporter: included in those changes is an accelerated plan to raise cash by selling b.p.'s non-core assets, or less than 10% of the company's total business. the company is guessing it will need $32 billion to cover costs and liabilities from the spill, well below some worst-case estimates of $60 billion. still, analyst cathy milostan says, by disposing of assets b.p. hopes to show investors it can pay for the mess. >> we're starting to see what i call building blocks of being able to demonstrate that there is cash that they can access to cover oil spill costs. the issue here is, there's still a good deal of uncertainty as to what the future costs could be. that uncertainty continues to dog b.p.'s stock. the shares hav
there has been, and continued to be some layoffs of our u.s.-based crews. >> susie: certainly there have been some economic consequences here. it seems like the latest moratorium is focusing more on the safety aspects. let's look at what ken salazar said about this yesterday. he said "i remain open to modifying the new deepwater drilling suspension. but industry must raise the bar on its practices, on deepwater safety, and the oil spill response." so has your company made any changes in its safety procedures to deal with these kind of situations? >> well, yes, we have. almost immediately we began reviewing the procedures that we had in place. we don't have a full accounting yet of what happened on the horizon, but from events and data that has been released, we were able to concentrate on key areas and make sure that we had adequate procedures, adequate training of pena people in those areas. additionally, the industry began several studies and made recommendations to secretary salazar on immediate steps that could be made to improve safety. i think most of those are in place already. pr
would actually be there. but what happens is that because for example, u.s.a.i.d.-- again an organization that has a lot of good will in it-- it also moves with the political agendas of the united states government and so project... projects or assignments or those that are applied for by n.g.o.s become limited to those things which go straight along with the u.s. agenda. so these are the kind of things that have to be thought out very very clearly. one of the kind of no-brainers in things where i would encourage people to put money is in rubble clearing. >> this is jean baptist and this was one of the main streets. this is the area we're working on clearing now. >> this corner, people stay here like late at night. they're having fun here, there was a t.v. here, there was water here, but most of the people used to hang out here. >> so this was like the town square. >> exactly. >> rose: time after time when ski people about haiti, that's what they say, you need to get rid of the rubble. >> you'll do no harm by clearing the streets to let the haitian people make their own co
24 hours of questions, the u.s. government orders bp to press on with the key pressure test on it it's blown out well in the gulf of mexico. world cup fever gives way to budget bliss. the prime minister spain warned of tough times ahead. -- world cup fever gives way to budget blues. and the iranian nuclear scientist who surfaced in washington is on his way home. welcome -- welcome to "bbc world news," broadcast to our viewers on pbs in america, also around the globe. my name is mike embley. coming up later for you -- a guided tour around the disputed land. our correspondent gets are rare glimpse inside tibet. the chinese government is never far away. in this special report from the tropical mountain forests of kenya and the fight to protect this east african paradise. hello to you. the u.s. government has ordered bp to proceed with a key pressure test on its blown out well in the gulf of mexico. the point is to establish whether they should press ahead and sealed the well completely. officials held the work up for 24 hours until bp could answer the question if this could do more harm
will be payable to the u.s. government. >> one of the criticisms is that, after the explosion, you were a bit to focus on the financial impact and not on the human tragedy of the individuals who lost their lives. >> in every crisis, there are things of that i could have done differently. once we are through all of this, we can look back and draw conclusions and learn from this. >> no questions at all, please. >> if the blow on the right cannot answer questions about the bp future, maybe those who have pension funds should worry. >> another story that involves bp, the u.s. senate committee investigating the release of the only man convicted of the lockerbie bombing has put off the hearing is scheduled for thursday. robert menendez, who was about to take care, has announced the postponement because key witnesses have refused to appear. he was very critical. >> it is utterly disappointing. it is pretty outrageous that's none of the key witnesses will cooperate with our request to answer questions before the senate foreign relations committee. the have stonewalled. each side has claimed innocence
. >> but the taliban have admitted that the attacks have disrupted their activities. u.s. officials told the bbc that over 600 militants have been killed in strikes since president obama took office, and very few civilians. many in pakistan think they're politicians support the attacks, a charge the government in islamabad denies. >> i hope the u.s. will consider its. give us the technology. we know where to, how to do it. then we will have ownership. when this thing happens, people will recognize it. >> some of those who fled the area say they are sick of the politics and the violence. >> i moved because of my children's safety. i do not know who to blame. islamabad, washington, or the taliban. we just cannot bear it anymore. >> it will take a long time for northwest pakistan to get out. america insists the strikes must continue to be part of the solution. bbc news. >> our coverage is also available via world service radio today and on line as well. there is a fat file, detailed maps -- there is a fact file, the tell the house, and the views of one pilot who worked in afghanistan's helmand prov
been asking for four years before the earthquake. shortly after the earthquake the u.s. government announced they were going to grant temporary protected status. they're talking about giving haitians who have not been applying for it and the numbers the u.s. would have liked -- going back to your larger question. one thing i have noticed is there is more compassion on the part of the u.s. government toward haiti. and toward the policy that the u.s. is 6000. a lot of haitians will tell you if it meant a lot when president obama said we will be there for as long as it takes and will do whatever it takes to get haiti on its feet again. haitians are looking at that to say, we will take you at your word. let's see how we can work together to build a haiti that is much better than the one in existence on january 11. tavis: me it took the loss of hundreds of thousands of lives tuesday that u.s. compassion come to bear. what is your sense of how the haitian people are feeling about this situation? tell me what your senses. >> one of the things that i say about the haitian people as i have
for another month. those russians accused of spying in the u.s. may be heading home in a prisoner swap. it was widely reported today that an exchange is in the works. five of the russian suspects were being moved from virginia and boston, to new york. the other five suspects are already there. they could be traded for several people convicted in russia of passing secrets to the u.s. more than 50 iraqis were killed in attacks across baghdad today. 32 of them died in a suicide bombing. the victims were shi-ite pilgrims crossing a bridge to a shrine to commemorate a shi-ite saint. the attack came despite tight security. the u.s. toll in afghanistan rose again today as three more troops died in a roadside bombing in the south. that made 10 americans killed so far in july. also today, an airstrike mistakenly killed five afghan soldiers in the east. the afghan ministry of defense-- m.o.d.-- complained, and the international security assistance force-- i-saf--said a joint investigation was underway. >> ( translated ): we have started investigating the incident since this morning, we also con
documents detailing five years of u.s. war efforts in afghanistan. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. on the newshour tonight, authors steve coll and phil smucker assess what the secret material says about the conduct of the war. >> woodruff: phil shenon of the "daily beast" updates us on what is wikileaks and who is behind it. >> brown: fred de sam lazaro reports on the first sentence handed down by a war crimes tribunal to a member of cambodia's "killing fields" regime. >> woodruff: john merrow wraps up his series about the top to bottom efforts by a school superintendent to reform the new orleans public education system after hurricane katrina. >> making promises, talking publicly about all the big changes he's going to make in the schools. well, it's been three years, time for paul vallas's report card. >> brown: and we look at the impact of the americans with disabilities act on this, the 20th anniversary of the law. >> he didn't come because politicians thought it was a good idea. it came because people with disabilities fought and said we're going to be equal. we're going to
deepwater oil exploration. >> as the u.s. fights to pacify the b.p. gusher in the gulf, the p51-- owned by brazils national p51-- owned by brazil's national oil company, petrobras-- is pumping 24/7 from similar depths below the sea. its the newest platform in >> brown: paul solman talks to greek prime minister george papandreou about the violence in the streets and the turmoil on the financial markets, as greece falls further into debt. >> woodruff: and, we close with a profile of the next poet laureate of the u.s., w.s. merwin. >> as soon as i could move a stub of pencil and put words on paper, i wanted to be a moat. i mean, i was fascinated by the poems my mother had read to me and by the hymns that we sang in church. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corp
before. >> reporter: economists say the recent skittishness in global markets is also making many u.s. firms cautious about their hiring and capital spending. and it's not just fortune 500 companies that are reluctant to commit to new workers. manager min tu of this new york city subway shop says he doesn't need any more help. >> now, we are not hiring. now, we have enough people for this business. last year is okay, but before we had four to five people. now is slower; four is okay. >> reporter: that trend is bad news for the u.s. economy, because small businesses typically are major job producers. economist thomas berner says small firms are not very optimistic about the prospects for future sales in the current economic environment. >> they're worried about where the cycle is going, like everybody, and that adds to their uncertainty on top of not being able to borrow money as easily or at the same rate as, for example, larger companies. >> reporter: hiring momentum may be slowing in the u.s., but most experts do believe companies will continue to add jobs to their payrolls this yea
evening. two big developments tonight concerning the u.s. financial system: the senate passed the most comprehensive financial reform bill since the 1930s. and susie, late today, goldman sachs settled its civil fraud case with the s.e.c., agreeing to pay more than half a billion dollars. >> susie: tom, we begin with that historic reform bill. it's designed to prevent financial crises in the future. the senate approved the legislation by a vote of 60 to 39. the president is expected to sign it into law next week. >> tom: the new rules will mean huge changes for consumers, and for banks across the country, from the big banks like j.p. morgan, citi, and bank of america to smaller regional firms. darren gersh reports. >> reporter: it's a safe bet school kids decades from now will be quizzed on the dodd- frank wall street reform and consumer protection act. they'll be asked about the new financial stability oversight council, and how it was empowered to identify and correct the kinds of risks regulators missed in the great recession; about the new consumer protection bureau, covering most e
evening, everyone. the u.s. economy lost jobs in june, the first time that's happened this year. tom, today's employment report didn't give americans much to cheer about as they head off for the holiday weekend. >> tom: susie, 125,000 jobs were lost, mostly because thousands of temporary census bureau workers left their jobs the unemployment rate fell unexpectedly to 9.5%, down from 9.7%. but that's only because many people stopped looking for work. >> susie: today's report reinforced worries that the economic recovery could be getting off track and the economy will slow over the next six months. scott gurvey has explains. >> reporter: if you were expecting today's report on employment in june to provide a clear picture of the outlook for the rest of the year you were disappointed. and if policymakers at the fed and in congress were looking to the report for guidance in the debate between additional stimulus and a new austerity they too were disappointed. the private sector did add jobs and more jobs than it added in may. and yes, the unemployment rate fell. but that was a result of
them to one of the new york airports to be transported to moscow. >> as the u.s. strikes a deal with the former enemy, it mends fences with an old friend. >> the bond between israel and the united states is unbreakable. >> the bond between the united states and israel is unbreakable. >> while on the domestic front, republicans and democrats look for a little mojo. with the president on the campaign trail -- >> hello, nevada, hello kansas city! >> carnahan wants to move forward. missouri wants to move forward. that's the choice in this election. moving backwards or moving forwards. >> as republicans debate among themselves, who speaks for the party? >> every time something happens, you know, people say oh, step down. well, the reality is that's not happening. so stop the noise on that. >> you don't want to mess with me. >> i'm joined by pierre thomas of abc news, christi parsons of "tribune" newspapers, john harwood of cnbc and "the new york times," and john dickerson of "slate" magazine and cbs news.>> award-winning reporting and analysis, covering history as it happens. live fr
in europe, you see more value there than in investing in any u.s. companies? >> i think so. it is not to discount the united states. the united states should grow faster than europe. it is just which the values and the prices have been discounted so substantially in europe because of the problems with their banks and the potential bailouts of greece and so on, that value is presenting itself. >> susie: now, it's interesting, even though today we had a big rally, and the stock market hasn't been like this in the last couple of weeks, and investors have been so worried, pouring their money into bond funds and into u.s. treasuries, and you see the best days of bond investing are over. how long can investors count on decent returns from bonds? >> i think the best days are over. and that means, simply, the days of price appreciation in terms of bonds added to the yield, which in many cases produced double-digit types of years are over, but it doesn't mean that bonds will go down in price and that 3% to 4% to 5% yields available to investors through pimco funds and others aren't
. a coalition of interfaith leaders rallied in front of the u.s. capitol this week to mark the three-month anniversary of the bp oil spill. religious and secular group called on congress to stop accepting campaign contributions from oil companies and any money currently donated to the oil companies be passed around to the cleanup effort. the protest took place on the jewish holiday where jews lament the destruction of the first and second temples of jerusalem. >> today is not enough to mourn an ancient temple because the temple of all humanity is in danger of destruction. >> for people along the gulf coast, the oil spill crisis continues to take a severe economic and emotional toll. kim lawton traveled to the louisiana bayous this week to talk with people in the fishing industry and with local religious leaders trying to give them material and spiritual support. >> reporter: it's sunrise over louisiana bayou country. normally, this is when the fishermen here set out in search of shrimp and oysters and crabs. but things aren't anywhere near normal. instead of fishing, these men have b
and supported by the u.s.. >> i recall that comment from bush. immediately after he gave that speech he came to a studio in new york at the embassy. my crew had him on this program. we interviewed him shortly after that speech. it was a fascinating day to talk to him. >> in the film we have kirschner, his friend. he says that he likes to go chavez as a friend, but he needs to think about a successor. right now the system needs to be made sure it works. >> that does not bother you? that he is setting himself up to be like castro? >> there is always an norris scrooge -- enormous scrutiny on the election. not only do they have an electronic balances, but at the same time they have two groups. far better than florida in 2000. there was a 75% turnout. better than obama. >> whe is putting off referendums. saying that he once had a third term. is hard going down there. i will not say that it is easy, but i will give you an example. he fires people that are his friends because of corruption. sometimes you get a post in the government position and you steal. the moment they get fired they go to the p
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